Why Australian dealers don’t want to sell electric cars | Business Insider

 

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Source: Why Australian dealers don’t want to sell electric cars | Business Insider

1st its probably a bad business decision short term for they would need to redo their whole business model as it effects servicing etc. Not to mention the employees to be retrain for EV or replaced with relevant trained staff.

Is the education system for apprentices geared up to met the demand if it comes?

Distances traveled look at most countries that lead the way in EV sales the distances needed to travel are short, doesn’t really suit Australia.

A good laugh is the biggest talker of EV cars is Freo’s Mayor Brad Pettitt does he own one NO his private car is a fossil fuel based one.

If you recharge in a public place your EV is more than likely being powered by coal as that’s what generates the electricity.

Battery driving distances are short. Australian driving Distances are long.

The countries who are driving hard on EV have only lifted sales with huge taxpayer funded benefits. Norway is a good example perhaps one of Tesla’s best consumers, but now the government funded rebates are being removed sales are expected to plummet.

Tesla failed to make any real impact on China the worlds fastest growing car market.

The battery business is a dirty one rare earth minerals is a dirty job for 3rd world countries so western ones can drive their EV’s.

Rare earth mining in China: the bleak social and environmental costs

Why Your Electric Vehicle Might Not Be as Green as You Think

Tesla’s new batteries may be harder on the environment than you think

“In a 2013 report, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Design for the Environment program concluded that batteries using nickel and cobalt, like lithium-ion batteries, have the “highest potential for environmental impacts”. It cited negative consequences like mining, global warming, environmental pollution and human health impacts.”

The Rare-Earth Crisis

“If the supply of rare earths falls short of demand in the coming years and no substitutes that approach their performance are found, makers of hybrid and electric cars will probably try to develop new motor designs that rely on induced rather than permanent magnetism, says Eric Rask, a researcher at Argonne National Laboratory. Before joining Argonne two years ago, Rask worked on the power-train system for General Motors’ electric Volt, which uses a rare-earth permanent magnet. But, he says, “the reason permanent-­magnet motors are used is that their efficiency is almost always higher in the range where you use it a lot—typically you can get more torque for a given supply of current.”

Few experts express optimism that there will be enough rare-earth materials to sustain significant growth of clean energy technologies like electric cars and wind power, which need every possible cost and efficiency advantage to compete. “The writing is already on the wall,” says Patrick Taylor, director of the Kroll Institute for Extractive Metallurgy at the Colorado School of Mines. “You want to develop this big new energy economy, but there’s a limited supply and an ever-increasing demand.” Asked how China gained its edge over the rest of the world, Taylor points out that most of the necessary expertise and industry began moving to that country nearly two decades ago. Back then, he adds, no one was even paying attention.”

 

Fremantle Car Power, Whats in it for us?

The most popular electric car, a Nissan Leaf, over a 90,000-mile lifetime will emit 31 metric tons of CO2, based on emissions from its production, its electricity consumption at average U.S. fuel mix and its ultimate scrapping. A comparable diesel Mercedes CDI A160 over a similar lifetime will emit 3 tons more across its production, diesel consumption and ultimate scrapping. The results are similar for the top-line Tesla car, emitting about 44 tons, about 5 tons less than a similar Audi A7 Quattro.”

 

Fremantle what happened to the Electric Car?

 

 

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