Turnball Gives Perth Freight Link (PKL) Tick Of Approval

Perth Freight Link is a really important, game-changing project for WA, with massive benefits for the freight industry, commuters and the livability of people living around Fremantle port,” he said.

Source: Light rail gets nod from Canberra – The West Australian by Andrew Probyn

He warned any Federal contribution to MAX light rail would not be at the expense of the Perth Freight Link, which has attracted $925 million in Federal funds.

Projects like MAX could be funded through the Fremantle Port privatisation which would trigger federal payments through the asset recycling program.

Councils Push for Big Road Projects, well not Freo Council?

 

Councils push for big projects

Amazing the city of Cockburn and Armadale are pushing for big road projects in the cities, guess why;

  • To combat major road congestion
  • Growth of the cities
  • To improve Productivity
  • Road safety
  • To make hotspots safer
  • To attract business
  • To attract good development
  • To improve employment prospects
  • Efficency

According to the Mayor of Cockburn, congestion erodes business competitiveness and impacts negatively on productively and employment.

So these councils say building a new road will help improve their city’s.

Yet Fremantle City Council believe a new road into Fremantle

  • Will destroy business
  • Kill off the city access
  • Make roads more dangerous
  • Add congestion
  • Stop development
  • Kill off employment
  • etc.

Does this not sound strange, other councils are fighting to get government development, business, infrastructure, etc  into their city ,yet COF  is doing its best to stop or drive it out.

A version of Perth Freight Link could bring a lot of opportunities to Fremantle, but only if the local government fights to get the best possible outcome for its design, just like other citys in Perth are doing for their developments. Instead our Council just says no they don’t want it.

Anti-car of course means anti-road, which leads to anti business, anti growth, anti development, anti employment.

Look around Western Australia, find a  place that’s really thriving, is it going forward by stopping cars getting to where the occupants/shoppers/visitors want to go?

Ones a plan for growth, the others a plan for vacancies, not hard to see how Freo’s plan is working out?

What’s happened to Fremantle Councils Missed Opportunity with Plastic Bags

plastic bag smile1

The council and Mayor Brad Pettitt instead of pushing for a law to fine/punish business for not using the biodegradable bags, could have taken this idea and turn it more to a marketing opportunity. Given Fremantle another brand, it would even opened them up to run a competition for logos, branding, marketing etc.

Taking something like the BID, and using a Fremantle branded Biodegradable bag to sell to businesses in town, with a simple QR barcode on the bag that could link back to a website promoting all the business that have Opted to join Fremantle’s councils save the ocean or cut plastic bag usage or whatever program. It could be used as a tool to promote Fremantle businesses that are ecco friendly or ethical.

Giving consumers and informed choice of where they could choose to shop and businesses a choice of whether they take part or not. More carrot less whip.

Then there are the added benefits to business that bulk purchasing would lower the cost to the business, as collective buying would enable you to bargain a better price for bags, giving business a lower cost than them going out and sourcing them for themselves. Possible seasonal marketing programs, shops using the brand to promote their own business etc. The city using it to promote events etc.

Instead of education and encouragement the council has chosen the whip over the carrot to drive their ideology with Fremantle businesses and wasted time and resources with a pissing contest with the state government. Which smells more of more of cheap nasty party politics than good environmental outcomes. Fremantle’s councils true weakness.

Personally I’m all for changing the plastic bags to a better product, but I’m against the COF starting its own little state by making up its own laws, especially when the law they put in place will have little to no practical outcome. Fremantle banning bags will no practical measurable outcome for the environment, its just another cheap political stunt, some banner waving to distract from real issues the cities has. Its also another example of poorly spend rate payers money for something that will have little or no benefit in the end at all.

If what the Fremantle council says is true why do Fremantle business use plastic bags why do they have them at all?

If customers didn’t want plastic bags they would not use them.

So if what the council says is true that business and customers don’t want them then the bags would not be in shops and customers would chose not to take them. If the community feeling was so strong this issue would have sorted its self out by now

We don’t need another level of government making laws.

Banning plastic bags in Fremantle would achieve nothing, Fremantle’s retail is dying as it is, how many people in Fremantle shop outside Freo where the ban would stop. So just bringing back their plastic bags from other suburbs.

It’s ridiculous to think the plastic bag is legal on the east side of East St and illegal on the west side of it.

The efforts should be placed making the bags ban for the whole state or country.

While the council is preaching why do they use single use plastic bags in their own street bins with no garbage separation? Fremantle city council can’t even supply recycling bins in the streets it all goes straight to land fill

recycle bins

Something Fremantle Lacks

Why does the council not have separated garbage for commercial operations in town instead everything goes into one bin for land fill I guess.

Perhaps they should get their own house in order first before dictating to the world how it should be?

America already has a screwed up system with county’s making their own laws and enforcing them, lets no go down that path and leave law making to the State Government. Its starting to look more and more political the actions of Fremantle council and less and less like a local government to take care of services and amenities to the resident and rate payers of Fremantle.

Over the last couple of days there has been a bit chat about the state government not pushing through the COF plastic bag ban.

Peter Katsambanis MLC has said  the businesses he has spoken to are not in favour, hes probably better off to not to name them so they don’t have to suffer any backlash from some of the extremists.

Bid to block plastic ban irks councils I’m always amazed to hear councillors say how they speak for the majority especially when so few people actually vote in local elections. If the MLC is so out of touch with community wants/concerns etc, again I ask why so many people use plastic bags and so many businesses have them, if community will was as strong as they make out, this issue would be self regulating with customers refusing plastic bags or not returning to shops that use them, businesses not wanting to lose customers would naturally change their operation to keep customers happy, but that’s not what happening, so who’s out of touch with what the real majority want?

Bid to block plastic ban irks councils

“Mr Katsambanis last month introduced a motion to disallow Fremantle’s plastic bag ban. The law has been tweaked since Fremantle’s last attempt was disallowed by the parliamentary committee charged with reviewing local laws, which includes Mr Katsambanis.

Mr Katsambanis said Fremantle retailers had overwhelmingly told him they feared being disadvantaged if the ban went ahead. He said allowing councils to introduce plastic bag bans “ad hoc” would lead to uncertainty and disadvantage local small businesses.

“Local governments have an important role to play in their community but every law or by-law that they pass is subject to review by the State,” he said. “Many of these retailers have expressed fear that if they went public with their concerns there may be a backlash from council or the proponents of the plastic bag ban.”

Fremantle Council Whats the Real Deal on Plastic Bag Ban?

Fremantle’s Plastic Bag Saga

So I guess we are waiting for parliament to sit so we can find out what the outcome will be.

 

Premier takes passenger s seat – The West Australian

Premier Colin Barnett joins State Political Editor Gareth Parker to discuss issues concerning WA voters.

Source: Premier takes passenger s seat – The West Australian

Here is the bit I’m sure interests all the locals on the PFL.

The section on the light rail is interesting as well.

PERTH FREIGHT LINK

GP: One of the issues that a lot of people wanted to talk about on our Facebook pages and on Twitter is the Perth Freight Link. It’s a very expensive project, it’s a very contentious project. Why are you going ahead with it?
CB: Perth is quite a unique city. We have a population of just under 2 million, but Perth is also a major trading point. We don’t have much manufacturing industry scattered around the suburbs of Perth, and yet we’ve got huge mining, petroleum and agricultural industries. So we’ll always have large amounts of heavy transport, chemicals transport, agricultrual produce, minerals, coming out of rail systems and the like. That makes us a little bit different, our ports are very important. The project, I think, should be looked at in two stages. The first stage is Roe 8, which is taking (traffic) from the (Kwinana) Freeway through to Stock Road. Now, whatever the future of the port may be, Roe 8 is needed, both to service the Fremantle Port and a future port at Cockburn.

GP: Do you say that Roe 8 could take traffic south as well as north (from Stock Road?)
CB: Wherever the port goes, you need Roe 8. So Roe 8 will be the first stage and a lot of work has done into that, its design, environmental approvals, it really is ready to go. We think work will probably start next year on Roe 8. The second component is getting heavy vehicles, not only through Roe 8, but into the port. There are all sorts of issues there, because we’re going through established residential areas. So the design work is not yet complete. A fair bit of work needs to happen on that. We do need to have a better access into Fremantle. Fremantle will continue to grow as a port for another 15 years, then it will continue (as a working port). It’s not going to close. There seems to be a view that Fremantle is going to close. It won’t. It will reach its capacity then continue to operate at that capacity. In about 15 years time you will start to see extra port facilities develop in Cockburn. It won’t be as big as Fremantle initially, but by 2030 maybe it will become the main port. So at that stage, you will also need the access to go to Cockburn.

GP: There’s two main options beyond Roe 8. One is to take it north on Stock Road, then west on Leach Highway and High Street. The other option the Transport Minister is looking at is tunnelling. You’re supposed to award a contract by December. Are you confident you’ll have enough information to be able to pick an option that’s within Budget by December?
CB: No I’m not. I think that’s probably a bit tight.

GP: It will be pushed out?
CB: Well I think we’ve got to get this right. And it is complicated. For the moment, the concentration will be getting Roe 8 underway.

GP: So you’re now saying this is really a two-stage process?
CB: There are two projects. Interconnected, but Roe 8 is the start, get Roe 8 built, then build the connection into Fremantle. So there is a bit of time to sort that out, and there are complex issues, one of which is the choice between different road routes, or tunnelling – a lot of work to be done to investigate that. There is also the issue of how do you get across the Swan River and into North Fremantle and the port facilities.

GP: Indeed, because even if you build the $1.6 billion link, it only takes you to Canning Highway, doesn’t it.
CB: It will get you there, then you need to get across the river. That’s the southern part of my electorate of Cottesloe. I’m very conscious of the issues of getting that tight corner into the Fremantle port area.

GP: So I guess given that uncertainty, and that issue about getting traffic into the port, a lot of people are wondering why you don’t just take the investment, send it further south to service a new road and rail corridor into a new port down at Cockburn.
CB: Well, the new port is probably $4 billion or $5 billion to build. And it’s not needed yet. It will be needed, but probably not for another 15 years. So we’re not going to build a road system to a port that isn’t there.

 

 

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